Aadhaar

The UIDAI has taken two successive governments in India and the entire world for a ride. It identifies nothing. It is not unique. The entire UID data has never been verified and audited. The UID cannot be used for governance, financial databases or anything. It’s use is the biggest threat to national security since independence. – Anupam Saraph 2018

When I opposed Aadhaar in 2010 , I was called a BJP stooge. In 2016 I am still opposing Aadhaar for the same reasons and I am told I am a Congress die hard. No one wants to see why I oppose Aadhaar as it is too difficult. Plus Aadhaar is FREE so why not get one ? Ram Krishnaswamy

First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.-Mahatma Gandhi

In matters of conscience, the law of the majority has no place.Mahatma Gandhi

“The invasion of privacy is of no consequence because privacy is not a fundamental right and has no meaning under Article 21. The right to privacy is not a guaranteed under the constitution, because privacy is not a fundamental right.” Article 21 of the Indian constitution refers to the right to life and liberty -Attorney General Mukul Rohatgi

“There is merit in the complaints. You are unwittingly allowing snooping, harassment and commercial exploitation. The information about an individual obtained by the UIDAI while issuing an Aadhaar card shall not be used for any other purpose, save as above, except as may be directed by a court for the purpose of criminal investigation.”-A three judge bench headed by Justice J Chelameswar said in an interim order.

Legal scholarUsha Ramanathandescribes UID as an inverse of sunshine laws like the Right to Information. While the RTI makes the state transparent to the citizen, the UID does the inverse: it makes the citizen transparent to the state, she says.

Good idea gone bad
I have written earlier that UID/Aadhaar was a poorly designed, unreliable and expensive solution to the really good idea of providing national identification for over a billion Indians. My petition contends that UID in its current form violates the right to privacy of a citizen, guaranteed under Article 21 of the Constitution. This is because sensitive biometric and demographic information of citizens are with enrolment agencies, registrars and sub-registrars who have no legal liability for any misuse of this data. This petition has opened up the larger discussion on privacy rights for Indians. The current Article 21 interpretation by the Supreme Court was done decades ago, before the advent of internet and today’s technology and all the new privacy challenges that have arisen as a consequence.Rajeev Chandrasekhar, MP Rajya Sabha

“What is Aadhaar? There is enormous confusion. That Aadhaar will identify people who are entitled for subsidy. No. Aadhaar doesn’t determine who is eligible and who isn’t,” Jairam Ramesh

But Aadhaar has been mythologised during the previous government by its creators into some technology super force that will transform governance in a miraculous manner. I even read an article recently that compared Aadhaar to some revolution and quoted a 1930s historian, Will Durant.Rajeev Chandrasekhar, Rajya Sabha MP

“I know you will say that it is not mandatory. But, it is compulsorily mandatorily voluntary,” Jairam Ramesh, Rajya Saba April 2017.

August 24, 2017: The nine-judge Constitution Bench rules that right to privacy is “intrinsic to life and liberty”and is inherently protected under the various fundamental freedoms enshrined under Part III of the Indian Constitution

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the World; indeed it's the only thing that ever has"

“Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.” -Edward Snowden

In the Supreme Court, Meenakshi Arora, one of the senior counsel in the case, compared it to living under a general, perpetual, nation-wide criminal warrant.

Had never thought of it that way, but living in the Aadhaar universe is like living in a prison. All of us are treated like criminals with barely any rights or recourse and gatekeepers have absolute power on you and your life.

Announcing the launch of the#BreakAadhaarChainscampaign, culminating with events in multiple cities on 12th Jan. This is the last opportunity to make your voice heard before the Supreme Court hearings start on 17th Jan 2018. In collaboration with @no2uidand@rozi_roti.

UIDAI's security seems to be founded on four time tested pillars of security idiocy

1) Denial

2) Issue fiats and point finger

3) Shoot messenger

4) Bury head in sand.

God Save India

Friday, April 20, 2018

13319 - Aadhaar data isn’t safe, say denizens - Deccan Chronicle

DECCAN CHRONICLE.
Published
Apr 19, 2018, 2:47 am IST

A visitor N. Ram Babu also left by saying that Aadhaar is not good because it makes us lose our privacy and our personal data gets shared.

In Japan, finger print is being used to withdraw money from ATMs. Only in our country, finger prints are being collected by the government in the name of Aadhaar. — Sai ram Web developer

Hyderabad: Hyderabadis feel that their data privacy through Aadhaar is inadequate, if ones goes by the re-sponses at the Hyderabad Fest -2018.

The fest which is being organised by Spoorthi Progressive Society for the first time this summer at NTR Stadium from April 13- 22. It features a stalls on science, arts and literature.


Since data privacy has been the focus of many debates recently, an NGO Swecha has decided to ask Hyderabadis as how safe do they think their personal data stored in the Aadhaar servers is.
To elicit the opinion of the visitors, they have set up a chart with two options —one with yes and another with no. The visitors will have to sign under whichever option they chose to agree with.

Surprisingly, the option “I don’t feel that my personal information in Aadhaar is safe” got tremendous support, suggesting that people don’t seem to trust that their data is safe with Aadhaar. 

Some of the prominent personalities like producer Tamma Reddy Bharadwaja, script writers Parchuri brothers, singer R.P. Patnaik, lyricist Ashok Teja Suddala, who were guests at the Hyderabad fest, also held that their data has been compromised. 

A visitor N. Ram Babu also left by saying that Aadhaar is not good because it makes us lose our privacy and our personal data gets shared.

Apart from the reservations on data theft by third party, there are also other deeper fears, including the nature of data itself, especially the biometric data which cannot be changed.
Sai Ram, who is a web-developer, said: “It is not just the Aadhaar number because even my fingerprints are vulnerable. In Japan, finger print is being used to withdraw money from ATMs. Only in our country, finger prints are being collected by the government in the name of Aadhaar. With such advancing technologies, we certainly need better privacy.”

On the other hand, some people believe that when you have nothing to hide, it is acceptable to share the data. “It is okay to compromise the data and give details,” a visitor said.

“This is a welcome change that people understand that their privacy is being compromised. Data is in the central repository of Aadhaar. But the database has its own mirrors. Almost every transaction is tracked and more than 90 per cent of personal data is compromised,”  Ranjit Raj of Swecha, a research scholar at IIIT-H, said.


13318 - Probe into dumping of Aadhaar cards begins - TNN

TNN | Apr 19, 2018, 12:59 IST

TIRUPUR: A day after Aadhaar cards and postal letters were found dumped in garbage, two officials from the regional office of the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) visited Tirupur south tahsildar office to conduct an inquiry. The officials would submit a report to their higher-ups.

The sack containing Aadhaar cards and about 700 letters that were supposed to be delivered by Gandhinagar sub-post office was found dumped along Parambikulam Aliyar Project (PAP) canal near Alagumalai

LATEST COMMENT
why to probe. adhar gaanndu deserves that place. RIP
Anonymous

On information, Tirupur south tahsildar Gopalakrishnan recovered the sack. The district collector directed the sub-collector to conduct an inquiry.

Meanwhile, the postal department has also initiated an inquiry. “Letters dating December 16 were found inside the sack. They were supposed to be delivered by temporary workers. It was not known who dropped the sack near the canal. We would receive the bundles after the revenue department completes its inquiry. A departmental inquiry would be conducted,” said postal superintendent K Gopinathan.


13317 - AADHAAR: Fading Fingerprints Mean This Ageing Space Scientist Can't Care For His Son - Huffington Post


"There are not many of us of alive; you can't ignore us."

By Indrani Basu

MANSI THAPLIYAL / REUTERS

Radha, 75, a vegetable vendor, poses with her hands after she got her fingerprint scanned for the Unique Identification (UID) database system at an enrolment centre at Merta district in the Indian state of Rajasthan on February 22, 2013.

For 54 years, Chandrasekhar hasn't been able to move from his bed. Born with a 97% physical and mental disability, he can't communicate with anyone. His parents have taken care of him his entire life. But now his future is uncertain.

"We have come to realise he might survive us," said P.V. Manoranjan Rao, Chandrasekhar's 81-year-old father. "But whenever I try to make some arrangement for my son, I fail."
Rao is a space scientist who retired as the Group Director of Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre of the ISRO (Indian Space Research Organisation) in 1996. Unlike most octogenarians, he is comfortable with technology. But now technology — specifically biometrics — is failing him.

Last year Rao, who lives in Thiruvananthapuram, sought to add his son's name to one of his bank accounts, so Chandrasekhar's care that could continue without Rao and his wife Anjali's active involvement.

But Rao's fingerprints could not be read by the bank's biometric machine, and he couldn't link his account to Aadhaar and add his son's name. He tried to get an Aadhaar card for his son, but officials were unable to record Chandrasekhar's fingerprints and iris scan. Chandrasekhar's application for Aadhaar is still "under process" according to the Aadhaar website, Rao said.

"Aging results in loss of collagen; compared to younger skin, aging skin is loose and dry. Decreased skin firmness directly affects the quality of fingerprints acquired by sensors."

Biometric authentication forms the cornerstone of India's controversial universal identification project, also known as Aadhaar. Repeated government directives have pushed millions of Indians to try to link their Aadhaar with essential services like bank accounts and mobile telephones. Yet, most biometrics, particularly fingerprints, degrade with age as skin loses its elasticity, according to experts. Thus, while the fingerprints remain the same — it becomes harder for machines to recognise and match the prints of the elderly.

The "difference in fingerprint image quality across age groups, is most pronounced in the 62-and-older age group," according to Impact of Age Groups on Fingerprint Recognition Performance, a paper by Shimon K. Modi, Stephen J. Elliott, Jeff Whetsone, and Hakil Kim at the College of Technology at Purdue University. "Aging results in loss of collagen; compared to younger skin, aging skin is loose and dry. Decreased skin firmness directly affects the quality of fingerprints acquired by sensors."

For senior citizens like Rao, the deterioration of his fingerprints has meant he and his disabled son could soon be locked out of their bank accounts.

"It is humiliating to get an Aadhaar card for my son," Rao said, describing how Aadhaar officials struggled for an hour to get a legible thumbprint from Chandrashekar. "I do not feel like begging anybody. There is a limit to how much you can appeal to people."


MANSI THAPLIYAL / REUTERS

A villager goes through the process of a fingerprint scanner for the Unique Identification (UID) database system at an enrolment centre at Merta district in the desert Indian state of Rajasthan February 22, 2013.

The looming uncertainty of his son's future has pushed Rao to petition the Supreme Court to allow Indians over 75 years of age to access Aadhaar services — an ever growing list — without biometric authentication. Senior citizens should only need to produce a self-certified copy of their Aadhaar card to access services, Rao requested the apex court.
He is yet to receive an acknowledgement of his petition, he said.

"There are not many of us alive," he said, referring to his fellow senior citizens. "You can't ignore us."

Exclusion
Biometric deterioration means the elderly are the most vulnerable to Aadhaar exclusion. Rani Devi, a 69-year-old woman from Rajasthan's Barmer district, has been unable to access subsidised food under the government-mandated public distribution system since September last year.

"They can't read my thumb impression in the machine," she said, and so can't verify her identity with her Aadhaar card. Without linking the two, they have refused to give her monthly ration.

"There are not many of us (above the age of 75) alive," he said. "You can't ignore us."
-PV Manoranjan Rao, 81

Meanwhile in Maharashtra, 84-year-old N.V. Padmanabhan can't update his Aadhaar because his fingerprints have become illegible with age. He had signed up for Aadhaar soon after the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) was established in 2009. At the time, his initials were enough to process the Aadhaar card, his son Ravi said.

But after it became mandatory to have the card holder's full name on the document, Ravi had to take his ill father to an Aadhaar centre.

"He stood in line to give his fingerprints," recalled Ravi. "But a week later we were told the fingerprints were illegible because of his advanced age." They went to another centre, where though his name was updated, they have still not received an updated card and they cannot track what happened to their application.


THE WASHINGTON POST VIA GETTY IMAGES
A public hearing in New Delhi organized by the Right to Food campaign, where people from around India came to speak about how Aadhaar authentication problems were preventing them from getting food rations, on March 15, 2018.

In New Delhi, 82-year-old retired government employee R.M. Swami lost his phone number earlier this year after his fingerprints didn't match the biometric data recorded for Aadhaar three years ago. He had tried to port his Reliance Communications phone number to Airtel after the former telecom company announced its plans to shut down. But because of the new requirement to link Aadhaar to your mobile number — despite it being still deliberated by the Supreme Court — Swami could not keep the number, his son Mukesh said.

Swami finally got a new phone number using his wife Ratna Devi's fingerprint. Curiously, his 76-year-old wife's fingerprints cannot be recorded by their bank, which accepts Swami's thumb impression.

These stories are common across the country. Though the UIDAI acknowledges these problems, and individual officials have attempted to solve these problems on a case-by-case basis, there is no centralised solution easily accessible for the elderly. Telecom secretary Aruna Sundararajan had promised last year to introduce iris scans instead of fingerprints for linking mobile numbers to Aadhaar cards for senior citizens. Last week, the government said it would allow people to access their pensions without needing Aadhaar or give their fingerprints, but pensioners and their caregivers say any changes are yet to be implemented.

"If the government is making Aadhaar mandatory then they should also make it easy," said Ravi Padmanabhan, whose ill father has to make a trip to the bank each year to get an annual certificate to get his pension. "No help is being given and it's hard to get any response."

Aadhaar Enrolment system has provision to enrol even a person with ill-defined fingerprints or missing biometrics. #AadhaarForAll pic.twitter.com/WqiiKBFjjp


I had approached with a similar request for my dad which was not even acknowledged. Do what you commit or don't publish such things.
Meanwhile, Rao has taken to writing letters to anyone who will listen, hoping that his Supreme Court petition will help solve the problem for elderly people.

"I ask my friends to forward my letter to somebody who wields some power," said Rao. "And solve this problem created by the government insensitive to old people."
"I understand governments are impersonal," said Rao. "But you just need a human heart and minimum respect for elderly people."

13316 - UIDAI brings updated QR code for offline Aadhaar verification - TNN


PTI | Updated: Apr 18, 2018, 20:01 IST

NEW DELHI: To provide an extra layer of privacy to Aadhaar, UIDAI has introduced an updated 'QR code' that holds details like name, address, photo, and date of birth, and can be used for offline user verification without the 12-digit ID number, sources said. 

With Aadhaar increasingly becoming the nationally-accepted ID for all kinds of work, the new QR code, that now comes with photo, can be used in offline mode in a way that will safeguard against any tampering of documents. 

This would be especially handy for establishing the identity with non-statutory entities, say, the likes of online shopping portals when delivering goods. 

Aadhaar holders can download and print their biometric ID with the QR code from the website of Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) or its mobile app. 

A QR code is a form of barcode label which contains machine-readable information. 

Users can manually blacken the Aadhaar number and use the printout with the new QR code for establishing their identity, offline too. 

For example, when an online shopping delivery is made and the delivery man asks for ID, Aadhaar holder can show him the printed QR code which when scanned (through an updated QR code reader on Aadhaar site) would read non-sensitive information. 


This includes name, address, date of birth and photo, thus establishing the bonafide identity, sources said. It will also ensure that Aadhaar holder is genuine and not using any tampered ID documents.

Aadhaar number is not given out in the entire process, nor are biometrics, thus ensuring that privacy is maintained throughout the verification process. This new feature is available through Aadhaar downloads. Sensitive information would include details like bank accounts or biometrics, among others.

TOP COMMENT
QR code must be put as tattoo in everyones A$S in the country. Yeah!!!
GINGER GURU

Ajay Bhushan Pandey, CEO of Aadhaar-issuing body UIDAI, said: "The offline QR code is a landmark development which will allow everyone to establish their identity through offline verification without giving out Aadhaar number."

He added: "Only in those places where Aadhaar number is required under the law including banks, telecom companies, or for availing subsidies, one will have to go through the authentication process." 


13315 - Google, Facebook, Twitter can't be compared with Aadhaar, clarifies UIDAI - Times of India


TIMESOFINDIA.COM | Updated: Apr 18, 2018, 22:35 IST

HIGHLIGHTS
  • The nature of information and the algorithms being used by global companies like Google and Aadhaar is different, UIDAI counsel Rakesh Dwivedi told the SC
  • Unlike Google, UIDAI does not plan on using data analytics and learning tools to analyse Aadhaar data, Dwivedi had said
NEW DELHI: Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) has clarified that media reports quoting UIDAI’s Counsel Rakesh Dwivedi’s argument yesterday in the Supreme Court that Google is trying to fail Aadhaar are inaccurate. 

Senior advocate Rakesh Dwivedi had submitted before a CJI-headed Constitution bench that as far as Google, Facebook and Twitter are concerned, they cannot be compared with Aadhaar due to the nature of information being different and also due to difference in the nature of algorithms being used. While Aadhaar is only matching biometrics, the other global companies are using learning tools for analysis of data, which creates knowledge. 


Further, UIDAI is prohibited under the law to do any such data analysis and therefore cannot conduct surveillance of any kind. He further said that UIDAI does not permit any Requesting Entity (RE) to collect and analyse Aadhaar data and use the same for any commercial purposes. 

13314 - Aadhaar Articles Dated 19th April 2018




Times of India
Senior advocate Rakesh Dwivedi had submitted before a CJI-headed Constitution bench that as far as Google, Facebook and Twitter are concerned, they cannot be compared with Aadhaar due to the nature of information being different and also due to difference in the nature of algorithms being used.






HuffPost India
Repeated government directives have pushed millions of Indians to try to link their Aadhaar with essential services like bank accounts and mobile telephones. Yet, most biometrics, particularly fingerprints, degrade with age as skin loses its elasticity, according to experts. Thus, while the fingerprints ...








Firstpost
We take a look why Aadhaar should not be compared with Cambridge Analytica. Also, the idea of Google and smart card companies lobbying against Aadhaar seems unlikely. In other news, Narendra... More Videos. Aadhaar is not India's Cambridge Analytica - #DailyDope · Whatsapp UPI payments is ...






Times of India
Tirupur: A day after Aadhaar cards and postal letters were found dumped in garbage, two officials from the regional office of the Unique Identification ... The sack containing Aadhaar cards and about 700 letters that were supposed to be delivered by Gandhinagar sub-post office was found dumped along ...






Deccan Chronicle
Hyderabad: Hyderabadis feel that their data privacy through Aadhaar is inadequate, if ones goes by the re-sponses at the Hyderabad Fest -2018. The fest which is being organised by Spoorthi Progressive Society for the first time this summer at NTR Stadium from April 13- 22. It features a stalls on ...

Thursday, April 19, 2018

13313 - Aadhaar Data Leak Can Influence Poll Outcome, Says Supreme Court - NDTV


The focus on illegal use of data by third parties has sharpened following the Facebook data misuse case, which became public last month. Today, the Supreme Court said "the real apprehension" was whether democracy can survive if Aadhaar data is used to influence electoral outcome


All India | Reported by A Vaidyanathan, Edited by Anindita Sanyal | Updated: April 17, 2018 18:51 IST


The Supreme Court earlier said Aadhaar data can be used for commercial purposes.

NEW DELHI: 
HIGHLIGHTS
  1. "Aadhaar data is not an atom bomb": Aadhaar authority UIDAI said in court
  2. Last week, court had expressed concerns about possible misuse of data
  3. 5-judge bench hearing petitions that question the validity of Aadhaar
A leak of Aadhaar data can influence the outcome of an election, the Supreme Court said today, continuing its exploration of the matter amid the huge controversy over the illegal use of Facebook data in the US elections. Last week, the court had expressed concerns about the possible misuse of data of 1.3 billion Indians. It drew a sharp response from the Aadhaar authority UIDAI, who said "Aadhaar data is not an atom bomb".

"The real apprehension is the data available can influence the electoral outcome of a country... whether democracy can survive if Aadhaar data is used to influence the electoral outcome," said Justice DY Chandrachud, who was part of a five-judge bench hearing a clutch of 27 petitions that questioned the validity of Aadhaar, flagged privacy issues and data leak.


The focus on illegal use of data by third parties has sharpened following the Facebook data misuse case, which became public last month. Disgraced British firm Cambridge Analytica had used data for psychological profiling on behalf of Donald Trump. The matter became a hot-button political issue in the country, with the Congress and the BJP trading charges of data misuse.

The court, which asked UIDAI for an account of its data protection procedure, today said the "problems are not symptomatic but real". Asking what were the "nature of the safeguards" in absence of a data protection law, Justice Chandrachud said, "We can't have a blinkered view of reality, because we are going to lay down a law which will affect the future".




Last week, the court asked if biometrics collected by the registering entities share the information with others once it obtains consent. Denying the possibility, the UIDAI said the moment the data is submitted, it is encrypted. "So there is no leakage or sharing of data," it added.

The Aadhaar authority, which has been under immense pressure since the first reports of data leak surfaced last year, today hinted at a conspiracy theory.

Senior advocate Rakesh Dwivedi, who represented UIDAI, said the petitioners have argued that smart card is better than Aadhaar. "They want smart card because institutions like Google don't want Aadhaar to succeed," he said.

13312 - Govt wants to link flight tickets to Aadhaar, privacy activists call it a terrible idea - The News Minute

Ministry of Civil Aviation is rolling out Aadhaar-based paperless boarding using biometric verification but experts are critical of the decision.
The Civil Aviation Ministry plans to roll out a project under which domestic passengers can link their Aadhaar to air tickets at the time of booking. This they say would allow passengers to travel to the airport without a valid ID card, as biometric verification will be done at the airport to confirm their identity. Making the boarding process paperless, passengers will, however, need to carry a mobile phone with their e-boarding card, which will then be scanned at security and at the boarding gate. This the Ministry claims will remove cases of fake tickets and help locate missing passengers at airports.

In June last year, the Minister of State for Civil Aviation, Jayant Sinha had launched a report on ‘DigiYatra’ and briefed the media about the ‘DigiYatra’ initiative of the Ministry. He claimed that the initiative will develop a digital ecosystem that will ensure a seamless, consistent and paperless service for the customers.

Under this initiative, the flyers’ biometrics will be checked and verified using infrastructure like retina scan, fingerprint scanners etc and the Aadhaar-linked airline database will show which flight they are to board and which parts of security and boarding procedure they have cleared and which ones are left, thus eliminating the need to show paper ID cards, paper tickets and boarding passes.

The process is not yet finalised and some changes are expected. Earlier this week, Aviation Secretary RN Choubey told the Times of India that the government will issue a template for this “Digi-yatra” by the end of this month and this process could be flagged off at Bengaluru and Hyderabad as early as July 2018. However, linking tickets to Aadhaar is not mandatory and hence, all the airports will continue to keep the existing paper-based boarding system also.

A pilot was conducted at Hyderabad and Bengaluru airports over a year ago and the results of the same are being considered to improve the systems. When TNM contacted Archana Muthappa, GM & Head for Corporate Communications & CSR at Bengaluru International Airport, she confirmed that there will be changes in the process but no details are known yet as consultations are still going on.

"A Technical Working Committee (TWC) comprising AAI and a few leading private airports are working on it. Specific details of the Policy – currently in the final stages of development – will be communicated by MoCA. As such, until MoCA communicates details of the Digi-Yatra policy it may not be prudent on our part to put out a story. The information we currently have is dated and based on a pilot conducted over a year ago," said Archana, who confirmed that biometric infrastucture, like retina scan, fingerprint scanning machines etc, were used in the pilot.
However, the move by the Civil Aviation Ministry comes at a time when the Supreme Court is still debating the validity and scope of Aadhaar amidst concerns of big data misuse and surveillance.

Calling the project a terrible idea, Nikhil Pahwa, founder of MediaNama and Internet Freedom Foundation said that fingerprint authentication is a probabilistic science based on percentage accuracy of matching. “Someone will be refused entry or passage at some point in time, because fingerprints may not match. It will always fail for someone somewhere. We've seen high failure rates in Jharkhand,” argued Nikhil.
There have been concerns about fingerprint authentication for people who do some physical labour and senior citizens. Countering the project’s purpose, Nikhil said that the new process will, in fact, end up resulting in long queues and chaos. “Given how incompetent our government is with securing data, this will be just another way that citizens’ data could leak. Aadhaar, if it is allowed to continue, should have a very limited use case, and should not use biometrics. Biometrics, once leaked, are compromised forever, especially because of their permanence.”

report in Medianama also argued that it would be naïve to believe that linking Aadhaar to tickets will eliminate the cases of fake tickets as people who want to travel with fake tickets will continue to use the existing paper-based system.
Mishi Choudhary, a technology lawyer and digital rights activist warned that this was yet another form of making AADHAAR de facto unavoidable.

“The only other place where biometrics based identity has been used for movement in the name of ease and efficiency is in China. It always starts in the name of increased efficiency and ease, quickly devolving into a system where data is gathered and used for control. The Chinese Government can now stop people from buying air and travel tickets based on their social credit score i.e. if it does not approve of someone's political views, ethnic identity etc.”

She questioned why one needed Aadhaar for enabling mobile boarding passes. “Why does one need Aadhaar for enabling mobile boarding passes? Any form of identity card should be acceptable. Paper savings can be achieved without AADHAAR.”
Srinivas Kodali, an independent researcher focusing on intelligent transportation systems, questioned the validity of Aadhaar as a whole, given the ongoing case in the Supreme Court. Pointing out inherent contradictions in the government machinery, he said, “The UIDAI and Attorney General in the Supreme Court are contesting that no one can use Aadhaar for surveillance or tracking while the Civil Aviation Ministry wants to also track where a passenger is inside the airport to avoid delays in boarding. The Civil Aviation Ministry probably is not informing the public that Aadhaar is required for their no-fly list program. This is what China is doing to deny its citizens airport/train services based on how obedient they are about government rules.”


Suggesting other ways to reduce paper usage, Srinivas gave examples of airports around the world which, “allow different levels of security checks and faster check-ins for a premium price which the business class travellers are used to. The current process of scanning barcodes is faster. Bringing in any untested technology is simply going to increase boarding time thus resulting in flight delays.”

13311 - e-Aadhaar can be used as a proof of identity - Live Mint


It also carries your name, date of birth, address and photograph, and 12-digit unique Aadhaar number

Last Published: Tue, Apr 17 2018. 08 06 PM IST

If you want to use your Aadhaar card as proof of identity or address, but have misplaced it or have simply forgotten to carry it, you can use e-Aadhaar instead. Just like your printed Aadhaar, popularly known as Aadhaar card, e-Aadhaar also carries your name, date of birth, address and photograph, along with the 12-digit unique Aadhaar number, and acts as a proof of identity, date of birth as well as address. 

When can you use e-Aadhaar?
It is possible that you misplace the copy of the printed Aadhaar, also called the Aadhaar letter, which you originally received from the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI). Or that your original printed Aadhaar had some errors, which you rectified online or at an enrolment centre but have not received an updated Aadhaar letter from UIDAI. 

In either case or even otherwise, you can download a copy of your Aadhaar from UIDAI’s website. It works like the Aadhaar letter that UIDAI sends, except that it also has the download date and Aadhaar generation date for the Aadhaar number printed on it. 

UIDAI had clarified in April last year that this downloaded Aadhaar or e-Aadhaar is a valid proof of identity. The Authority had issued this clarification in response to complaints that e-Aadhaar was not being accepted by various authorities. 

“An Aadhaar number, in physical or electronic form subject to authentication and other conditions, as may be specified by regulations, may be accepted as proof of identity of the Aadhaar number holder for any purpose,” states Section 4(3) of Aadhaar Act, 2016.

“It is informed that downloaded Aadhaar (e-Aadhaar) carries name, address, gender, photo and date of birth details of the Aadhaar holder in similar form as in printed Aadhaar letter. The downloaded Aadhaar also contains date of Aadhaar generation and date of Aadhaar download. The downloaded Aadhaar (e-Aadhaar) is a digitally signed document by UIDAI as per IT Act, 2000 which provides for legal recognition of electronic records with digital signatures,” the UIDAI circular states. 

The circular further clarified that e-Aadhaar is a valid and secure electronic document which should be treated same as a printed Aadhaar letter. “Ministries/Departments/State Governments/agencies accepting printed Aadhaar as proof of identity are hereby required to accept downloaded Aadhaar (e-Aadhaar) also as a proof of identity and not to discriminate it vis-a-vis printed Aadhaar,” the circular further stated. 

You can access the UIDAI circular here: bit.ly/2HGzmaT.

How to download  
The download Aadhaar option is available under the Aadhaar enrolment section of UIDAI website: eaadhaar.uidai. gov.in/. You have to enter your Aadhaar number or enrolment ID, name as with UIDAI, pincode of registered address and a security code. Like most other online Aadhaar services, this too requires access to your registered mobile number for OTP (one-time password). You can download your password-protected e-Aadhaar after entering the OTP. 

If you do not remember your Aadhaar number, you can still download it. For that, you will first have to retrieve your Aadhaar number by going to a link: resident.uidai.gov.in/find-uid-eid.

An OTP will be sent. Once you enter the OTP, your Aadhaar number will be sent to your email or mobile number. After that, follow the process mentioned above to download e-Aadhaar.

First Published: Tue, Apr 17 2018. 05 55 PM IST

13310 - Aadhaar [Day-29] There Is A Possibility Of Abuse Of Aadhaar Data To Manipulate Elections: Justice Chandrachud B - Live Law

: MEHAL JAIN APRIL 17, 2018 8:02 PM 


Read more at: http://www.livelaw.in/aadhaar-day-29-possibility-abuse-aadhaar-data-manipulate-elections-justice-chandrachud/